JSU students pack fresh and canned vegetables for semi-annual crop drop


Jackson State University students packed fresh and canned vegetables for their semiannual harvest drop. “It’s a beautiful process to learn to be part of the solution, to be able to help communities that really need it, especially rural communities, and to be able to tap into the history of black people and where we come from,” said Kelli Randal, a community farmer. Giving students freshly picked vegetables from the garden we’ve grown here on the ground here in Jackson, Mississippi. It’s just awesome. It makes me warms their hearts that they can get fresh vegetables,” said JSU student Vonita Harris. – Thousands of pounds of sweet potatoes that would otherwise have been wasted were also distributed. nal director of St. Andrews.Before the start of the event, there was already a long queue outside Blackburn Middle School. “I was just telling my friend that I can’t even come here. It was so difficult to come from my apartment this morning. There was traffic everywhere before seven this morning, so much that it makes my heart feel good,” said JSU student Markyel Pittman. “Our community gives so much to this school and gives so much back. It’s just a great opportunity today. “Students said they expect to see another crop fall later in the year.

Jackson State University students packed fresh and canned vegetables for their semi-annual harvest.

“It’s a beautiful process to learn to be part of the solution, to be able to help communities that really need it, especially rural communities, and to be able to tap into black history and where we come from. “said Kelli Randal, a community farmer.

Some of the bagged vegetables were those the students had planted themselves, including fresh green cabbage.

“What this is is an opportunity to give students freshly picked garden greens that we’ve grown here on the ground here in Jackson, Mississippi. It’s just awesome. It warms my heart that ‘they can get fresh vegetables,” said JSU student Vonita Harris.

Twenty thousand pounds of sweet potatoes that would otherwise have been wasted were also distributed.

“They’re just sitting in a warehouse. They’re not marketable, but they taste just as good and are just as nutritious,” said Langston Moore, regional manager for St. Andrews.

Before the event started, there was already a long queue outside Blackburn Middle School.

“I was just telling my friend that I couldn’t even come here. It was so hard to come from my apartment this morning. There was traffic everywhere before seven this morning, it makes my heart feel so good” , said JSU. student Markyel Pittman. “Our community gives so much to this school and gives so much back. It’s just a great opportunity today.”

The students said they plan to have another fall harvest later in the year.

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